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Newsletter May 2015


I have heard from several male and female senior golfers who have lost interest in playing golf due to their long term memory of disappointments over the years and not being able to play as well as when they were younger. 


In talking to low handicap senior golfers in their 70’s to 90’s who have accepted their physical changes, I found the following. As they age, golfers are prone to the “wear and tear” degenerative weaknesses that can require back and knee surgery. After surgery most golfers return to playing, but with limited restrictions. They say they have learned to practice less and be more tolerant of bad shots.


Most of the amateur golfers who ask for my help are so frustrated with their golf games that they are ready to give the game up. They have lost their passion for the game because they can’t play up to their expectations. The solution is always about changing a belief system that says if you put in a lot of effort you will achieve the results you want. 


My suggestion is to look at why you play golf. Golf, like any other game, is played for your enjoyment. Fun is what you did as a young person that made you feel like you wanted to keep on doing it. If you aren’t haven’t fun, golf will always be a mental, physical and emotional struggle inside yourself.    


What is your motivation for playing golf?


Golf is a vehicle for personal growth. It teaches us how to understand our inner Self on a deeper level. 


Do you really understand the game? Do you know that the golf course will win more times than you do? Do you know that we have different personalities, and some golfers will play very fast and some will play slowly? Do you know that when all parts of your game are working it is a rarity? Do you know that golf will challenge your patience, tolerance of others, your emotions, your beliefs and attitudes? Do you know that you are trying to avoid embarrassing yourself anymore? Do you compete to prove how good you are, not to just play and have fun? If you just compete to boost your self worth, all of the above will affect the way you view the game. 


Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer and Gary Player don’t play the Pro Tour anymore because they aren’t able to compete at that level anymore. Arnold at age 86 still plays every day just for the enjoyment to see if he can be competitive at another level with his friends. His motivation is to win the bets.


Ben Crenshaw, 63 two time Masters Champion retired from competing at the Masters this year in his 44th appearance after shooting 91-85. He has wonderful memories of playing against Nicklaus, Palmer, and Woods and being inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame. Ben has given up playing on the Pro Tour but he will return each year to The Masters to play in the Wednesday, Par 3 tournament.


At the country club I belonged to in Florida some of the male golfers started a group of 10 handicap and under players who played once a week. As they got older and their handicaps went up they searched for a group name to put on their golf caps. They considered names such as “could have been,” “never was” and decided on “Used to Bees.” Their logo was USTBee with a graphic of a small bee. Once a month they went out to lunch and in December met for a Christmas dinner with their wives.  Instead of lamenting growing older and not playing as well, they changed their attitude and had fun with the camaraderie of their senior friends.


How can I play well when I am older? 


When you were learning how to play the game of golf, you were motivated to learn all the different aspects of the different swings. Now it is time to trust what you spent so many years learning and just play the game instead of practicing so much and worrying about how to improve your swing. Concentrate instead of improving your short game because that doesn’t require your physical prowess and will protect you from shorter tee and fairway shots. When you have a good short game it will save you from being embarrassed and humiliated after missing shots.


Changing your attitude or belief system takes time and effort. Here are some reliable suggestions for putting the fun back in your “senior game.”

  1. If you have lost distance, routinely take 1-2 clubs more.
  2. Practice to develop confidence in your short scoring game.
    
  3. Stay physically fit so you don't get tired.
    
  4. Practice shots on the golf course instead of on the range.
    
  5. Move forward one tee box.
    
  6. Enjoy being outside playing with friends who love the game.
    
  7.  When your golf game isn't fun, have another game to play that doesn't require the same physical exertion.
    
  8. Join a 9-hole group and socialize with the extra time. Use the 9 holes as a practice round.
    
  9. Play games on the putting green for bets.
    
  10. Stop thinkiong about swing mechanics and focus more on scoring.
    
  11. Play golf courses that suit your game.
    
  12. Trade in your long irons for hybrid clubs.
    
  13. Use a shorter shaft in your driver for more accuracy.
    
  14. Play the game not to win, but to see how well you can score on each hole.

 

Play "in the zone" with Joan
Entrain Your Heart & Mind for Peak Performances

 

Improve your mental golf game now by listening to PMI self-hypnosis imagery CDs in the privacy of your own
home. You can order today at http://www.pmi4.com/cart

 

PMI 2015 - All Rights Reserved


 


 


 



 

 

Golf Advice for Senior Golfers

 

I have heard from several male and female senior golfers who have lost interest in playing golf due to their long term memory of disappointments over the years and not being able to play as well as when they were younger.

 

In talking to low handicap senior golfers in their 70’s to 90’s who have accepted their physical changes, I found the following. As they age, golfers are prone to the “wear and tear” degenerative weaknesses that can require back and knee surgery. After surgery most golfers return to playing, but with limited restrictions. They say they have learned to practice less and be more tolerant of bad shots.

 

Most of the amateur golfers who ask for my help are so frustrated with their golf games that they are ready to give the game up. They have lost their passion for the game because they can’t play up to their expectations. The solution is always about changing a belief system that says if you put in a lot of effort you will achieve the results you want.

 

My suggestion is to look at why you play golf. Golf, like any other game, is played for your enjoyment. Fun is what you did as a young person that made you feel like you wanted to keep on doing it. If you aren’t haven’t fun, golf will always be a mental, physical and emotional struggle inside yourself.   

 

What is your motivation to play golf?

 

Golf is a vehicle for personal growth. It teaches us how to understand our inner Self on a deeper level.

 

Do you really understand the game? Do you know that the golf course will win more times than you do? Do you know that we have different personalities, and some golfers will play very fast and some will play slowly? Do you know that when all parts of your game are working it is a rarity? Do you know that golf will challenge your patience, tolerance of others, your emotions, your beliefs and attitudes? Do you know that you are trying to avoid embarrassing yourself anymore? Do you compete to prove how good you are, not to just play and have fun? If you just compete to boost your self worth, all of the above will affect the way you view the game.

 

Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer and Gary Player don’t play the Pro Tour anymore because they aren’t able to compete at that level anymore. Arnold at age 86 still plays every day just for the enjoyment to see if he can be competitive at another level with his friends. His motivation is to win the bets.

 

Ben Crenshaw, 63 two time Masters Champion retired from competing at the Masters this year in his 44th appearance after shooting 91-85. He has wonderful memories of playing against Nicklaus, Palmer, and Woods and being inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame. Ben has given up playing on the Pro Tour but he will return each year to The Masters to play in the Wednesday, Par 3 tournament.

 

At my country club in Florida some of the male golfers started a group of 10 handicap and under players who played once a week. As they got older and their handicaps went up they searched for a group name to put on their golf caps. They considered names such as “could have been,” “never was” and decided on “Used to Bees.” Their logo was USTBee with a graphic of a small bee. Once a month they went out to lunch and in December met for a Christmas dinner with their wives.  Instead of lamenting growing older and not playing as well, they changed their attitude and had fun with the camaraderie of their senior friends.

 

How can I play well when I am older?

 

When you were learning how to play the game of golf, you were motivated to learn all the different aspects of the different swings. Now it is time to trust what you spent so many years learning and just play the game instead of practicing so much and worrying about how to improve your swing. Concentrate instead of improving your short game because that doesn’t require your physical prowess and will protect you from shorter tee and fairway shots. When you have a good short game it will save you from being embarrassed and humiliated after missing shots.

 

Changing your attitude or belief system takes time and effort. Here are some reliable suggestions for putting the fun back in your “senior game.”

 

  1. If you have lost distance, routinely take 1-2 clubs more.
  2. Practice to develop confidence in your short scoring game.
  3. Stay physically fit so you don’t get tired.
  4. Practice shots on the golf course instead of on the range.
  5. Move up one tee box.
  6. Enjoy being outside playing with friends who love the game.
  7. When your golf game isn’t fun, have another game to play that doesn’t require the physical exertion.
  8. Join a 9-hole group and socialize more. Use it as a practice round.
  9. Play games on the putting green for bets.
  10. Stop thinking of swing mechanics and more on scoring
  11. Play golf courses that suit your game.
  12. Trade in your long irons for hybrid clubs.
  13. Use a shorter shaft in your driver for more accuracy.
  14. Play the game not to win, but to see how well you can score on each hole.

 

Play "in the zone" with Joan Entrain Your Heart and Mind for Peak Performances

Improve your mental golf game now by listening to PMI self-hypnosis imagery CDs in the privacy of your own home. You can order today at http://www.pmi4.com/cart

© PMI 2015 - All Rights Reserved

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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